Thursday, May 15, 2008

Sacred Trash


Check out the bins.
(picture source)

11 comments:

Philangelus said...

The things you've got to do to keep your trash can from being stolen. ;)

I know, I know, you wanted comments about the Blessed Virgin sneaking some of us into Heaven when she's supposedly just dragging in the garbage bins, but I can see why a church would do that.

Allen's Brain said...

This is probably near-blasphemous to the Catholic faith, but perhaps those are for disposing of the host and consecrated wine left over after mass. Sort of like putting hazmat stickers on dangerous garbage.

ArchAngel's Advocate said...

Maybe it's where you deposit your sins BEFORE entering to the Liturgy?

The Ironic Catholic said...

Allen--if your comment was serious--FYI, the consecrated bread and wine are consumed or occasionally reserved for the sick. Even when the vessels are washed, the washwater is dumped directly to the ground (special sinks and all).

Allen's Brain said...

IC, I wasn't serious. I knew the elements had to be consumed.

The truth of the matter is that this is the only way to keep vampires from stealing your garbage.

The Ironic Catholic said...

ah, there you go. The voice of reason. :)

Jen M said...

At Holier Than Thou Parish, they do not bother to downplay evidence of their charism. Yes, even their refuse is holy. The entrance to the property is gated...with confessionals.

LarryD said...

Talk about cleanliness being next to godliness!

"Blessed are they that hunger and thirst after just trash, for they shall have their fill."

PraiseDivineMercy said...

Allen, about the disposal of such things, Father Z has a light-hearted but firm take on it:

"Just about everything that touched the sacred species or was consecrated that had to be disposed of gets burned and eventually put down the sacrarium. For example, if the Precious Blood spills on some thing wooden and it soaks in, the shavings of the wood must be burned and the ashed washed down the sacrarium. Linens for Mass must be washed first by a priest and the water put down the sacrarium. At the Sabine Farm, where I live away from Rome, I first wash linens and then pour the water outdoors, since the Sabine Chapel has no sacrarium, or even a sacristy to speak of. If a spider should fiendishly jump into the chalice after the consecration, and the priest can’t bring himself to drink it down, it is to be fished out with a pin, burned and, yes, put down the sacrarium. I used to think that was pretty funny and darn near impossible, until it happened in my little church in Velletri one day. This stuff is all spelled out in the front part of the pre-Conciliar Missale Romanum. The possibilities and solutions get amusing once you know the burining/washing/sacrarium principle. At a very clerical supper one night we mused about the possibility of a mouse dashing across the altar after the consecration and making off with a Host. Our solution was to bless a cat, put a white stole on it, send it after the rat, and when it came back, burn the cat and put the ashes, yes, down the sacrarium. That was actually Fr. JS’s solution: no cat lover, he. But I digress… "

Allen's Brain said...

Couldn't you just baptize the cat first and classify it as his/her first communion?

CMinor said...

Allen, you never tried baptizing a cat when you were a kid, did you?